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FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

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What questions can we help you with?

Midwest Contractor appreciates that what we do and the unique jargon in our industries is fairly unique. And how Midwest Contractor addresses your questions up front is indicative of our wish to be transparent and openly communicative to satisfy your concerns.  While perhaps not encompassing every possible question you might have, we hope our FAQ section provides you vital information —whether general topic education or to help narrow your decisions.

COOLING FAQs

We will periodically update the information in this section as technology changes and are happy to accept suggestions for additional Cooling System FAQs in the spirit of continuous improvement and our commitment to transparency and customer service.

What makes up my A.C. system?

The main A.C. components include the:

  • Temperature Controller (Thermostat)
  • Evaporator Coil (“A” Coil)
  • Air Handler
  • Condenser

Further:

  • The “A” Coil sits above the furnace (or under in downflow furnaces)
  • The “A” Coil is connected to the condenser, typically sitting outside on a pad, by two copper pipes.
  • The air handler in the furnace forces the cool air through the duct system to the cool the home.

How does my A.C. system work?

Here is the step-wise process:

  1. When the temperature rises above the setpoint (i.e., 74⁰ F), the thermostat “calls” for cooling.
  2. The condenser cools down and pumps refrigerant through a copper pipe to the “A” coil above (or below) the furnace.
  3. Warm air is then drawn from the home through the duct system by the furnace fan (air handler) and forced through the “A” coil.
  4. As air passes through the refrigerated (cooled) “A” coil, it extracts heat, and the moisture (humidity) is condensed.
  5. The cool, dehumidified air continues to circulate through the duct system into the home until the thermostat is “satisfied” by reaching the set point (74⁰F).
  6. The heat extracted by the “A” coil is absorbed by the refrigerant moving through the coil, transported through a second copper pipe to the condenser and expelled into the outside air.
  7. The water from the condensation process drips off the coil into a drain pan and typically runs through a pipe to a floor drain.

How often should I replace my A.C. system air filter?

  • The standard one-inch thick fiberglass filter should be replaced every 3-months and more often if children or pets are present in the home.
  • Replace two-inch thick filters every other month (every 2 months or 6 times per year)
  • Many newer units have special filters that replace annually.
  • Higher efficiency (Merv 8-11) 4-5 inch thick filters should be replaced every 12 months and more often (semi-annually) if children or pets are present to generate more airborne particles.

For more information on filter types, filter efficiency ratings, and the optimal air filter system for your home, see “What Makes Up My Indoor Air Quality System?” or call Midwest Heating and Cooling (614-252-5241).

How do I know if my A.C. is working correctly?

The primary function of your A.C. is to maintain indoor temperature at the setpoint on your thermostat.

Troubleshooting Criteria for a Malfunctioning A.C.:

  • If you have selected 74º F as the set point, and the thermometer reading varies 3º F or more above or below the setpoint.
  • Listen for abnormal sounds (buzzing, squeaking, popping, banging, clicking, etc.), both at the furnace and at the condenser outside.
  • Check for dripping water from the “A” coil drain pipe, where it terminates at the floor drain.
  • Check for ice on the “A” coil

Even if the A.C. system is maintaining temperature, a plugged air filter or dirty furnace fan wheel often cause low air flow, extra-long cycle times, and ultimately shut down of the entire system.

It is essential that the A.C. system shut down promptly if the above-noted issues are found to be present, as the continued operation with the above conditions can cause severe damage to the compressor or other components—resulting in costly repairs.

TIP: Run you A.C. during a warm day (70ºF or warmer) in spring or early summer for 30-60 minutes. Turn off the system if it is not blowing cool air (55ºF through the supply registers!

Call Midwest (614-252-5241) for a service call and beat the summer rush.

What should I check before calling for A.C. Service?

Confirm that you set the thermostat to cooling mode and at the desired setpoint (typically 70º F – 74º F). In the main circuit panel, check to be sure that the A.C. circuit breaker is in the “on” position. Change the filter if it’s dirty. Remove any obstructions (throw rugs, furniture, etc.) from the supply air registers and return air grills. Check that the front furnace panel(s) are securely locked in place.

TIP: Call Midwest (614-252-5421) at your earliest convenience, since service call backlogs can develop during “heatwave” periods.

What is required maintenance for peak performance and a valid warranty?

Most quality Heating and Cooling Contractors offer an Annual Service Agreement. The PCSA (Preferred Customer Service Agreement) offered by Midwest Heating & Cooling provides for an equipment tune-up for the Heating Season (furnace and heat pump) and the Cooling Season (air conditioner or heat pump). A Midwest Customer Service Representative calls to schedule each tune-up at your convenience during regular business hours (8 am – 5 pm, M – F). A qualified service technician performs the tune-up to keep your heating and cooling equipment operating at peak efficiency and to preserve your equipment warranty. As with your vehicle warranty that requires specific service routines (oil change, air filter replacement, transmission service, etc.), Heating and Cooling equipment manufacturers also require periodic maintenance to be performed to keep your furnace, heat pump, and air conditioner warranty valid. Check the warranty document that came with the equipment for further detail. Another car maintenance analogy that may be helpful: just as an auto tune-up results in better gas mileage, an “in-tune” A.C. system saves on your repair and electric bills.

What does my warranty cover?

A heating and cooling system warranty typically has two parts (equipment & labor).

  1. The key part covered for the furnace is the Heat Exchanger (20-years or lifetime); and
  2. The key part of the AC or heat pump is the compressor (5-10 years).

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Additionally:

  • Manufacturers warrant other covered parts for 5-10 years.
  • All other parts and labor (workmanship) have 1-year warranty coverage.
  • Extended labor warranties (5-10 years) are available to purchase at an additional cost.

.

Remember to have your annual equipment maintenance performed, to keep your warranties valid and your system operating at peak efficiency..

Specific warranties for your new A.C. should be noted on the installation agreement from your Heating and Cooling Contractor and further spelled out in the warranty document that comes with your new A.C. system.

TIP: If you can’t find your warranty document, call Midwest, and we will go online and print a copy for you (614-252-5421). Or call today to request a copy of our P.C.S.A. to assure that your A.C. is adequately maintained to keep its warranty valid.

How do I know if my A.C. should be repaired or replaced?

There are numerous criteria to evaluate to include:

  • Age and condition of the existing A.C. unit
  • Repair cost estimates
  • Whether this home will be your long-term residence, and
  • Whether your furnace needs replacing

.

All the above are just some of the critical factors in choosing to repair or replace your existing cooling system. As a general rule, if your AC is over 13-years old and/or requires costly repairs ($500 or more), consider opting for a new system..

Newer A.C. systems offer more reliable, efficient, comfortable service plus a warranty to cover repairs. Savings of more than 30% or so from utility bills and also savings from future repair costs covered under warranty will often pay for the new A.C. over time (typically about 7 years)..

For those who plan to reside in the home for the long-term, A.C. replacement delays can result in higher replacement costs.  Deferred replacements, by Murphy’s Law standards, seem to occur at the most inconvenient times..

For the homeowner who does not plan to reside in the home for the long-term, in a resale scenario, a home inspection will reveal the outdated system and can be a deciding factor or bargaining chip in a buyer’s interest.  With a new system in place, you increase your competitive advantage for property resale at the highest value..

TIP:  Newer A.C. coils that sit above (or below) the furnace are taller to meet government-mandated efficiency standards. These taller coils frequently do not fit in the original coil installation space. The “too tall” coil issue can be resolved by simultaneously installing a new shorter furnace made to accommodate the extra coil height.

How do I select the right A.C.?

Today’s A.C.s offer a wide range of features including 2 stage condenser fans, variable speed compressors, various efficiency levels (13-SEER – 20+ SEER), and microprocessors. The benefit is more precise control over the cooling cycle/dehumidification process, and better comfort at a lower cost. Some personal research at the library, in consumer reports, or online will help you be more familiar with feature and benefit options available. One such option is Trane. Heating and A.C. contractors are another excellent source of information. As with many major purchases, you need to trust and feel comfortable with your installing contractor.

How do I select the right Heating and A.C. contractor?

Your installing contractor is as important as your choice of A.C. equipment.

  • The contractors you consider should have factory-trained installers, a service department offering emergency service, and have been in business for at least five (5) years (preferably 10+ years).
  • Check with the Better Business Bureau for an A to A+ Rating and with Google (or other sites) for online reviews.
  • Ask for the contractor HVAC license number. They need to pull a permit to ensure that the installation will be approved to meet all codes by a city/county HVAC inspector.
  • You will likely rely on your A.C. contractor for advice, service, and warranty coverage long after the completion of your A.C. installation.

How much will my A.C. installation cost?

Cost can vary markedly as a function of the A.C. selected and the labor intensity of the installation.

  • A basic 13-14 SEER A.C. may be in the $2,000 range.
  • More energy efficient (15-20 SEER) air conditioners with extra comfort and other benefits will be two to three times the cost of a basic A.C.
  • More labor and material intensive installs also impact the A.C. total installation cost.
  • A quality installation that complies with city codes and the manufacturer’s installation manual entails a significant effort by factory-trained technicians.
  • Accordingly, the decision-making process whether to purchase a new A.C. should not be strictly price-driven.

Tip: Consult Midwest Heating and Cooling (614-252-5241) for more A.C. cost/benefit information and convenient financing options.

How is the energy efficiency of an A.C. measured?

The expression of A.C. capacity is in “British Thermal Units” (BTUs) or “tons” (12,000 BTUs per ton).

Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) is a value indicating the amount of cooling (BTUs per hour). The A.C. unit can generate per unit (kilowatt or KW) of electricity used. The higher the SEER value, the more energy efficient the A.C.

For example, a basic 13-SEER unit requires markedly more power to operate than an 18- or 20-SEER unit.

The annual power savings can be compared to the extra cost of a higher SEER A.C. to determine the payback period. For more information, see the A.C. Energy Efficiency Calculator below or call Midwest (614-252-5241).

Tip: Use our energy savings calculator to determine savings and the payback period for a higher SEER, more efficient A.C. system.

What should I know about the new R-410A Refrigerant?

R-22 was the refrigerant used in home A.C.s for many years. Often called “Freon” (a brand name), the government will ban R-22 completely in 2020, as an “Earth Unfriendly” substance.

In the interim, production of R-22 continues to reduce annually until 2020. As a discouraging factor with decreased supply, the price of R-22 has more than doubled and continues to increase. The impact on specific repairs for R-22 A.C.s is increased cost.

R-410A, the new more “Earth-Friendly” refrigerant, is used in today’s A.C.s and will likely be the industry standard for many years.

TIP: If you have an older A.C. or heat pump that is leaking R-22 refrigerant resulting in costly repairs, it may be time to replace it with a new R-410A system.

Are A.C. system rebates, tax credits, or discounts available?

Offers that reduce your new A.C. system price are available, time-sensitive and change periodically. The Utility Companies (AEP and Columbia Gas) and the equipment manufacturers offer mail-in rebates and instant discounts that can also significantly reduce the cost of a new heating and A.C. system.

TIP: Check with Government and Utility websites or call Midwest (614-252-5241) for more details.

How long will it take to replace my A.C.?

Completion of most A.C. replacements can take place in one work day. A more involved installation may take longer to perform. However, during extreme temperature periods, Midwest Contractor Installers remain until they restore cooling on the first day, and then return the second day to complete the job, as necessary.

Should I replace the furnace and A.C. or heat pump at the same time?

If both the furnace and air conditioner (or heat pump) are over 13 years old or if the unit(s) in question has a history of repairs, replacing the entire heating and cooling system would be advisable. Simultaneous replacement of both systems is more efficient for the contractor, and therefore less costly than replacing one now and the other system later. New and more efficient A.C. and heat pump indoor coils are taller in physical height; consequently, new furnaces are shorter to provide for fewer installation problems and lower labor costs with a compatible fit.

All A.C.s and heat pumps now contain the new “Earth-Friendly” refrigerant (R-410A). Therefore, if your existing unit uses the old refrigerant (R-22) that is phasing out by 2020, you will find refrigerant leak repairs for existing A.C. or heat pump system to be increasingly more expensive.

Finally, the new higher efficiency furnaces, air conditioners, and heat pumps work optimally when the heating and cooling systems come as a matched set. Microprocessors in the heating and cooling units along with the thermostat “communicate” with each other to provide more comfort and save on your utility bills.

TIP: If you are concerned about the reliability of your AC system and/or heating system call Midwest (614) 252-5241 and request a free no obligation estimate for a new high-efficiency system.

HEATING FAQs

We will periodically update the information in this section as technology changes and are happy to accept suggestions for additional Heating System FAQs in the spirit of continuous improvement and our commitment to transparency and customer service.

What is a Comfort System?

A Comfort System is typically composed of three systems (heating, air conditioning, and air quality) designed to keep the air in your home at a comfortable temperature and healthy to breathe.

What Makes Up the Heating System in my "All Electric" Home?

An Electric Furnace and a Heat Pump usually are the units that are connected to a temperature controller (thermostat) to keep you warm in the winter. The air handler (fan) in the furnace moves the air across electric heating elements similar to what you see in a toaster and then through the duct system into your home. Your Heat Pump “makes heat” more economically than the electric furnace and therefore usually cycles on first when the thermostat “calls” for heat.

What is a Heat Pump?

A heat pump is one component in an “all electric” home to heat (and cool) the home. The outdoor unit resembles an air conditioning unit but is designed to extract “heat” from the outdoor air and transfer it to an indoor coil. The heated indoor coil then warms the air forced through the coil by the air handler (fan) in the furnace to heat your home.

When the winter air drops below a specific preset temperature (20° F-30° F), the thermostat shuts down the heat pump, and the furnace takes over to keep your home cozy. The process reverses in summer, and the heat pump acts like an air conditioner to cool your home.

How Does my Gas or Oil Heating System Work?

Most heating systems in Central Ohio rely on burning fossil fuels (natural gas, propane gas or oil) as the heat source. As the unit heats air, the furnace air handler (fan) moves it past burners generating gas (or oil) flames and then into the home through the duct system. Setting the temperature controller (thermostat) at 70° F, it starts the furnace when the indoor air drops below the setpoint and shuts down the furnace when the air temperature reaches 70° F.

What Maintenance is Required for Peak Performance and a Valid Warranty?

Most quality heating and air conditioning contractors offer an annual Service Agreement. The PCSA (Preferred Customer Service Agreement) offered by Midwest heating & air conditioning provides for an equipment tune-up for the heating season (furnace and heat pump) and the air conditioning Season (air conditioner or heat pump). A Customer Service Representative calls to schedule each tune-up at your convenience during regular business hours (8 am-5pm, M-F). A qualified service technician performs the tune-up to keep your heating and air conditioning equipment operating at peak efficiency and to preserve your equipment warranty. As with your vehicle warranty that requires certain service routines (oil change, air filter replacement, transmission service, etc.). Heating and air conditioning equipment manufacturers also, require periodic maintenance to be performed to keep your furnace, heat pump, and air conditioner warranty valid. Check the warranty document that came with the equipment for further detail. Here is another car comparison that may be helpful. Just as an auto tune-up results in better gas mileage a heating system that is “in tune” saves on your gas and electric bills.

How Often Should I Replace my Furnace Filter?

The standard one-inch thick fiberglass filter should be replaced every three (3) months and more often if children or pets are present in the home. Higher efficiency (Merv 8-11) 4-5 inch thick filters should be replaced every 12 months and more often (semi-annually) if children or pets are present to generate more airborne particles. For more information on filter types, filter efficiency ratings, and the optimal air filter system for your home, see “What Makes Up My Indoor Air Quality System?” or call Midwest Contractor (614-252-5241).

How Do I Know if my Furnace is Working Properly?

The primary function of your furnace is to maintain indoor temperature at the temperature setpoint on your thermostat. If you have selected 70° F as the set point, and the thermometer reading varies 3° F or more above or below the set point your heating system may be malfunctioning. Listen for abnormal sounds (grinding, squeaking, popping, banging, clicking, etc.) that are likely indicators of furnace problems. Even if the heating system is maintaining temperature, a plugged air filter or dirty blower (fan) wheel often cause low air flow, extra long cycle times, and ultimately, a shut down of the entire system.

How Do I Know if my Heat Pump is Working Properly?

If your backup heat source (gas, oil, or electric furnace) is running rather than your heat pump during mild (above 40° F) winter days, the heat pump and /or control system may be malfunctioning. If your outside (heat pump) unit is running and the temperature is 3° F or more below the temperatures set point you have selected on your thermostat, you may have a system malfunction.

Listen for abnormal sounds (grinding, squeaking, popping, banging, clicking, etc.) from the outdoor unit or indoor air handler unit that are signs of problems. In the event of such sounds, shut down the system before further damage occurs.

Switch to emergency backup heat settings if the heat pump system runs but does not produce warm air. The furnace can then run and maintain a warm temperature in your home while the heat pump is disabled before repairs can get scheduled.

What Should I Check Before Calling for Furnace Repair?

Set the thermostat at an acceptable temperature (68° F-75° F), and ensure that it is in “Heat” mode with the air handler (fan) is in “Manual” or “Auto” mode. Check the filter and change it if clogged and restricting air flow. Be sure that the furnace breaker in the main electric service panel is in the “On” position. The toggle switch connected to the wire from the furnace must also be in the “On” position. If your gas furnace is 90% efficient or higher, check where the plastic (PVC) intake and exhaust pipes terminate outdoors to be sure that there are no obstructions (snow, spider webs, leaves, etc.) blocking the openings. Securely fasten the furnace front door (panel ) in place, so the fan safety switch is depressed in the “On position.”

What Should I Check Before Calling for Heat Pump Service?

Set the thermostat at an acceptable temperature (68° F-75° F) and verify the “Heat Pump” mode is enabled rather than the “Emergency Heat” mode.

Check the filter and change it if clogged and restricting air flow.

Be sure that the heat pump circuit breaker in the main electric service panel is in the “On” position.

Clear any obstructions (snow, leaves, grass clippings, cottonwood, etc.) from around the outside heat pump unit that may be limiting air circulation.

If the heat pump is still not working correctly, shut it down to avoid damage to the outdoor unit and switch to Emergency Heat until repaired.

How Do I Know if my Heat Pump Should be Repaired or Replaced?

Age and condition of the existing heat pump, repair cost estimate, whether this home will be your long-term residence, and whether you replace your furnace or air conditioner are some of the critical indicators in choosing to repair or replace your existing heating system. As a general rule, if your current heat pump is over 13-years old and requires costly repairs ($500 or more), opting for a new heating system should be considered. A new heat pump offers more reliable, comfortable, and efficient heat. New systems average a savings of 30% or so from lower utility bills as well as the elimination of immediate repair costs for systems covered under warranty. The purchase pays itself over time (approximately 7 years).

Delaying heat pump replacement may backfire if you plan to reside in your home long-term, You will discover that breakdowns always occur at inconvenient times and ultimately at a higher cost.

An essential consideration in the decision, too, is that that the new indoor heat pump coils are taller to meet government-mandated efficiency standards. The taller coils typically do not fit where the original coil installed. Installing a new furnace made to accommodate the taller coils resolves this issue.

ELECTRICAL FAQs

With the addition of Electric Services to the Midwest Contractor family, we still bring many years of experience via Purdy Electric’s team consolidation.  We hope these FAQs provide some answers to a very technical service in all homes and businesses.  We welcome suggestions.

What size electrical service system do I install in my home?

Most states call for 100 amps minimum, but with all the new electronic devices, air conditioning and electric heat, we suggest a minimum of 200 amps — especially in new homes. This also gives you some space for future additions. This is not a job for an unlicensed person to attempt. Midwest Contractor is not only fully licensed and experienced, but we can also obtain any necessary permits and inspections to keep you safe and legal.

If you upgrade the size of your electric service, it’s a major project that involves replacing everything from the service loop (this is the wire that extends from the top of your meter to the utility tie-in) up to, and including, the main panel.

When is it appropriate to call an electrician?

  • Are you resetting circuit breakers or changing fuses too often?
  • When you turn on your air conditioner, do the lights dim in the room?
  • Do your lights flicker or go on and off.
  • Can you smell something hot like electricity burning?
  • Do you find you are frequently overloading receptacle outlets with multi-plug power strips?
  • Do you too many (more than 5) electronic devices going in the outlet in back of your electronics center?
  • Do you have to use a two-prong adapter for items with three-prong grounded plugs?
  • Are you running extension cords to plug in electrical devices?

If you answered “Yes” or even “Maybe? to one or more of the above, then you likely need to call an electrician to assess your home or office and make appropriate reparations.

How electrical work much should I attempt on my own?

At the present time most states allow you to do whatever you want in your own home. However, DIY electrical is dangerous and can result in costly repairs as well as making more problems within your home’s system. How much are you willing to risk to initially save money?

Becoming a licensed electrician with the necessary certifications requires considerable training. Do not make a mistake by taking electricity lightly, even the smallest job could be a safety hazard. Why take a chance? Get a professional to do this work.

If a homeowner secures their own Electrical permit for work in a single family home, in case of damage or fire caused by his work, the homeowners insurance will not pay on a claim.  They will only if the work is done by a licensed Electrical Contractor.  Check your Homeowners Insurance Policy.

DIY jobs gone bad are always expensive to remedy. In all likelihood whatever money you thought you might save will more than double for someone licensed to come in and fix a mess created.

What is the half-circle-shaped hole that you see on electrical outlets these days?

This very important addition to modern electric outlets is there to ensure your safety. It is a ground built in to the outlet in order to prevent contact between a hot wire and a neutral one, thereby avoiding the danger of electric shock or fire.

If you move into an older house, you will likely need to replace old two-prong outlets with three-print grounded outlets.

What is the difference between a breaker panel and my old fuse panel?

Both devices, either breaker or fuse, are designed to trip (turn off) in the event of an electrical overload, i.e. 20amps of electrical load on a 15amp circuit would cause a trip. The only difference is that a breaker is mechanical and may be reset, whereas, a fuse is one time only and must be replaced. Please Note: Modern breakers are much more efficient and offer greater levels of protection.

ROOFING FAQs

Midwest Contractor knows roofs! If we don’t address your question, please send us an email, complete our contact form or give us a call at 614-252-5241.

Can my roof be repaired or do I need to replace it?

While a lot of people think that a leaking roof needs to be replaced, this may not be the case unless the roof is old. Missing, cracked, broken, and curling shingles can be repaired and replaced to stop a leak, while older roofs or roofs with multiple leaks or widespread issues should be replaced.

What does it cost to repair or replace my roof?

Costs vary greatly depending on the pitch of your roof, the type of shingles you have, what condition the roof is in, and how many layers of shingles you presently have installed.

The best way to find out the cost is to request an appointment with Midwest Contractor for a free, no-obligation written estimate.

I'm pretty handy - can I replace or repair on my own?

While some small jobs can be tackled by DIY homeowners, major work or a roof replacement is a pretty complex process that requires training and thus should be left to the professionals.  Safety issues and equipment needs alone justify calling professionals.

Professional roofing contractors go through extensive training and certification by the manufacturer of the materials in order to obtain an extended manufacturer warranty. The manufacturer won’t offer (or void) the warranty if the roof is repaired by a person he is not trained by the manufacturer.  And if your repair or replacement roof is related to an insurance claim, likely your carrier will not cover costs unless the work is performed by a reputable professional.

How long will my roof last?

There are numerous factors determining how long a roof will last.

While most roofs have a warranty, this doesn’t mean that your roof will necessarily go that long without requiring replacement. Some will wear out faster due to severe weather and environmental conditions, while others could last longer. Most roofs, however, are designed to last between 15 and 25 years; some types of slate and metal roofs could last longer.

What causes a roof to wear out?

Severe weather, direct sun, algae and mildew growth can all be factors in what causes a roof to wear out.

Hailstones striking the roof and removing some of the roof grit granules are also a problem. Darker colored roofs tend to wear out slightly faster than lighter colored roofs, too.

What size hail will damage a roof?

There are a lot of factors that go into whether or not the hail is damaging to a roof.

The age and condition of the roof can greatly impact how large a hail pellet needs to be. In general, however, pea and marble sized hailstones do not typically cause damage to a roof without high winds also being involved.

Will all homes in my neighborhood be impacted the same way by a hail storm?

No.  Hail storms can vary tremendously even in a small area. The roofs can all vary in terms of age and condition as well, and that impacts how they are affected.

However, that being said, the Columbus area has been showered with several major hail storms over the past half decade. On Easter Sunday, April 20, 2003, a hailstorm in Columbus caused $230 million in insured losses.

REMODELING FAQs

Remodeling whether a single room or whole house is a big step and likely thrusts many homeowners into unfamiliar territory.  If we don’t address your question, please send us an email, complete our contact form or give us a call at 614-252-5241.

What should I expect during a design-build remodel/renovation?

Midwest Contractor will take you through each stage of the construction process with precision and care.

The first stage of the renovation will be the design phase. At this point, you will sit down with our designer and discuss what you are envisioning for your space. We invest in the necessary time to learn about our clients to understand what is truly important to you, and in turn, we can determine how we can make this renovation turn from a dream to a reality.  We will generate plans and secure all necessary permits.

From here we go to the building stage. During this stage, our experienced carpenters will bring your plans to life. While they are working, our designer will continue to have weekly on-site meetings with you to keep you involved in the process. They will go over what has been completed, as well as what you should expect for the upcoming week.

While the work is being done, and when your home renovation project is finished, the area will always be clean.

The designer will have a final walk-through with you to ensure that you are completely satisfied with the final project and sign-off occurs.

How long will my remodeling project take?

The length of a project will vary depending on the scope of work, but we can give an idea of duration early in the design process. All of our construction agreements include an approximate start and completion date.

We appreciate that a remodeling project – no matter how small or significant is a major disruption to family life.  We’ll do everything we can to communicate transparently and keep you updated on the scheduling status.

Is there a chance the project could be more expensive than an initial budget?

We take time with our clients during the design process to help understand the costs associated with your project. We also do our best to identify any options you may choose in the future and include pricing for those options in our proposal.

Typically, when we sign a contract with our customer we hold true to the contracted price. We take the time to go over every detail of your project to ensure the cost is accurate. If there is any additional work or changes made to the project by the homeowner, this could result in an additional charge.  However, our designer will review new changes with you before work begins and to ensure their is a thorough understanding of any additional costs .

Can I live in my house during a remodel?

In most cases, yes, you can reside in the home during construction.

Our carpenters take care to section off the area where they are working to minimize disturbance throughout the rest of your house.  We will discuss all aspects of impact for not only general comfort and convenience but also child and pet safety. Depending upon the location of the project within your home, our team can work to set up a temporary kitchen.

FAQ August 2, 2018

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